ARM News

Open letter to Intel

with 4 comments

In what looks like a rather self-inflating statement by Nomura Equity Research, one of their top analysts has apparently written an open letter to Intel’s CEO, Paul Otellini, asking him to consider adopting the ARM architecture and using it as the basis for future generations of high-performance and low-power processors.

This is something that Intel is highly unlikely to do under the leadership of Otellini, but the idea that Intel may adopt ARM is nothing new. In fact, if we are correct about ARM successfully breaking into Intel’s high margin business, then they may have no option but to accept that x86 is not sustainable.

The article is well worth a read and highlights how many in the stock market now view the once mighty and powerful Intel. Unless they can establish a reasonable share of the tablet market within the next 12 months, we would expect some raised voices asking for Otellini to move aside. It’s not just about short-term profits; this is about long-term survival.

In addition, Intel will be reporting this first quarter’s result after the bell today, on Tuesday April 19th. We are very keen to find out how the total volume of Atom shipments this quarter compared to the same quarter in the previous year. We have less than 24hours wait. Any thoughts?

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Written by ARMnews

April 19, 2011 at 10:37 am

Posted in News

Tagged with , , ,

4 Responses

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  1. This is indeed interesting, but nothing significant as Intel already had ARM processor business before (bought from former Digital its StrongARM business, transformed it into XScale business and sold it to Marvel) and not only that, they currently *do* have ARM licensed processor in-house at least since they acquired Infineon Technologies AG. Their XMM 6260 platform contains ARM11 core: http://www.infineon.com/cms/en/corporate/press/news/releases/2010/INFWLS201002-031.html

    kcg

    April 19, 2011 at 10:59 am

  2. My thought is Apple’s Steve Jobs will vote with his feet and move its entire Mac line to ARM soon (transition start 2012 and complete by 2014).

    As to Otellini, he is actually very good for ARM because he has been sleeping at the wheel. Amazing changes are here after 30 years of x86 and Microsoft’s crapware (DOS, Windows).

    fan

    April 19, 2011 at 4:46 pm

    • I’m afraid that a move from x64 to arm in Mac line is not possible yet due to huge performance difference between Xeon and ARM — see Mac Pro line. Also as Mac line represent PC-era it’s destiny is probably to live and die with x64 era…

      kcg

      April 20, 2011 at 5:26 pm

      • My view of the world is different, more from the low-end … the average person on the street perhaps …

        1) I did not look this up, but my guess is less than 3% of Mac unit sales are its Pro line. 99% of the people in this world is perfectly happy surfing the web and watch videos with Intel’s low-end Core 2 Duo (on OS X or Windows XP). The bottleneck for most people is not the CPU (it is network bandwidth, slow server lookups, and the slow local HDDs). I would much rather spend my dollar on a SSD rather than on a faster Intel CPU. I use the Mac Mini on my desktop w/ its Intel Core 2 Duo, and the performance of the CPU is NEVER a problem. I do typical web stuff … surf, read, watch videos … the network is always the bottleneck.

        2) Apple’s current A5 cost $15/unit. Next generation Apple chips will always be under $25/unit. How much are Intel’s i3, i5, i7? Intel’s business model will finally be broken after 30 years. QCOM, NVDA, Samsung, etc, will have access to very good fabs now.

        3) I was not thinking of 64 bits. I don’t think 99% of the consumer cares or need 64 bits (again, because the network & HDD is the bottleneck). ARM’s A15 is around the corner and ARM’s 64 bit will follow after that if necessary.

        4) Think of the additional $$$Money$$$ Apple will capture by replacing Intel with its own chips. It’s a matter of time.

        fan

        April 20, 2011 at 8:08 pm


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